Wednesday, August 13, 2008

Umbrella Talk with playwright Andrew Moodie

This week on Umbrella Talk, we chat with Canadian playwright Andrew Moodie. Andrew tells us which dead director IS the coolest; which play he would consider to be crappy bad self indulgent theatre; and why he doesn't understand playwrights who don't know what to write about.


A bit about Andrew Moodie

Actor, playwright and director Andrew Moodie’s plays include the ground-shattering works Riot, which won the Chalmers Award; Oui; Wilbur County Blues; A Common Man's Guide to Loving Women; The Lady Smith; and the most recent 2006 hit The REAL McCoy. Andrew is a pioneer-in-the-making in our theatre community and he continues to promote diversity and equality within the community. He recently formed the organization, Share the Stage to promote the limitless possibilities of a more diverse theatre community in Canada. More ammunition has been building to promote this organization with the recent decision from The Shaw Festival to pass on producing one of his works due to the number of ethnic actors that would be cast in the play. For more on Andrew Moodie’s Share the Stage visit sharethestage.wordpress.com/.


Umbrella Talk with Andrew Moodie




What do you drink on opening night?

Double rum and coke. And I have about five. After that, I'm good.

Who would direct the coolest production of one of your plays?

Whenever I've asked the coolest person to direct my play they're either busy, or not interested. But to answer your question, Orson Welles. He's kind of dead, so I guess I understand why he hasn't returned my emails.

What scares you? What can't you write about?

Creating bad theatre scares the hell out of me. There is nothing you can't write about, you just have to figure out HOW to write about it.

What do you want to write about that you haven't yet?

Too many things. I really don't get someone who wants to write, but doesn't know what to write about. Are you kidding me? There are people in your life, people in your family, there are historical events from the distant past, historical events from the recent past, there are legends, and fairy tales, there's a hundred million feelings and ideas in your own imagination, you just have to pick one and then get to work.

The chilling fact, that I had to come to terms with a little while ago, was that I won't live long enough to write everything I want to. There are too many stories in my head, and not enough time to tell them. I don't want to die with a great story in my head.

If someone was to write a play about your life, what genre would it be? (eg. comedy, tragedy, melodrama, horror)

It would be in the genre of crappy bad self indulgent theatre.

How do you deal with praise? With criticism?

I ignore both.

Where would you like your work to be produced?

Anywhere.

Where do you write? Pen or keyboard?

I used to like restaurants, but it gets expensive, and when you have kids, they want you to be around for some stupid reason, so I usually write in my house. And I start off with pencil, then keyboard. I never use a pen unless I'm really hard up.

What would you like academics to write about your work in 50 years?

If anyone is actually interested in my work in 50 years, then they can write whatever the hell they want.

What inspires you?

Everything and everyone.

1 comment:

ian mackenzie said...

"I really don't get someone who wants to write, but doesn't know what to write about. Are you kidding me? There are people in your life, people in your family, there are historical events from the distant past, historical events from the recent past, there are legends, and fairy tales, there's a hundred million feelings and ideas in your own imagination, you just have to pick one and then get to work."

Awesome.

There should be a book called "How to cure writer's block".

This is the only sentence it would need to have.

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